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Re: O/T more campus design issues [7:60136] posted 01/02/2003
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Actually, if there is no NetBios Name Server (WINS), all the clients will
resort to broadcast (B-node) resolution (m-node, h-node) or simply fail
(p-node). I'd recommend checking out the following Microsoft KB articles:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;102725

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;119493

The first link describes the LMHOST file located on all Windows clients,
which might be your savior here if the network is small enough (simply add
the DC to the LMHOST file and reboot).  The other describes Netbios naming
in general.

I agree with James' statement about a DC on each subnet.  It really seems to
help legacy Windows networks.

""Priscilla Oppenheimer""  wrote in message
news:200301022247.WAA15521@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> James Willard wrote:
> >
> > Priscilla,
> >
> > You'll need to either have a domain controller on each segment
> > or set
> > the "ip helper-address x.x.x.x" on the DC-less interface on the
> > router
> > that's routing the two segments. In other words, if ethernet0
> > is on
> > subnet 1 without a DC, and ethernet1 is on subnet 2 with a DC,
> > place the
> > command on ethernet0. NetBIOS will attempt to resolve names by
> > broadcast, and the helper address will turn that broadcast into
> > a
> > unicast towards the IP of the DC you specify in the config. Let
> > me know
> > how that works.
>
> I may be showing my ignorance here, but that would address naming if the
> nodes were broadcast nodes (B-nodes), but does it address the customer's
> complaint that "clients can't find a domain controller for
authentication?"
>
> Anyway, we tried what you said and it didn't help, but there could be
> something else wrong too. Maybe the best solution is what you said about
> having a domain controller in both subnets??
>
> Thanks for your help and any additional suggestions.
>
> Priscilla
>
> >
> > James Willard
> > james@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: nobody@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:nobody@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
> > Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 5:16 PM
> > To: cisco@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> > Subject: O/T more campus design issues [7:60136]
> >
> >
> > You all remember my very simple campus network re-design that
> > I've been
> > helping out with? It sure has been keeping me humble. ;-)
> >
> > So we upgraded the single subnet to two subnets and two VLANs.
> >
> > Everything is working OK except for Windows networking. The PCs
> > on the
> > new subnet can't find a domain controller for authentication.
> >
> > So, you can feel free to yell at me for not gathering more
> > information
> > on the symptoms, but the client hasn't told me much. ;-) But
> > does this
> > ring a bell with anyone? Are there standard recommendations on
> > how to
> > handle this in a subnetted VLANed internetwork.
> >
> > I'm not too well informed on Windows networking. My co-author
> > wrote that
> > chapter in my troubleshooting book.
> >
> > Thank-you so much!
> >
> > Priscilla




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