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RE: OSPF reverse mask posted 04/20/2000
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nothing. When you use 0.0.0.0 as the reverse mask, it specifies the
interface to use/assign in an area. I like this better as you clearly know
when an interface is in an area. But if you have multiple interfaces you
need to assign to a specific area, using a wildcard mask can somewhat
simplify (less statements) the process.
If you did
net 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
net 172.16.5.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
any interface leading with 172.16.1.x would be assigned to area 0
same with area 1


Aaron DuShey


-----Original Message-----
From: nobody@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:nobody@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of
Stanley Seow
Sent: Thursday, April 20, 2000 6:42 AM
To: CCIELAB
Subject: OSPF reverse mask


A quick question....

For example, if the OSPF area X have a /22 bit mask...for the configuration
on the router, can I use the specific interface IP address (host mask )

network 172.16.1.1 0.0.0.0 area 0
network 172.16.5.1 0.0.0.0 area 1

instead of calculating the reverse mask for odd subnet bit like /22 /25 /26
/27.

What is the differences betwen the above two reverse mask ??

Stanley




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